Antarctic treaty, Washington, December 1, 1959.
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Antarctic treaty, Washington, December 1, 1959. by Conference on Antarctica (1959 Washington, D.C.)

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Published by H.M. Stationery Off. in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Antarctica

Subjects:

  • Antarctica -- International status.

Book details:

Edition Notes

English, French, Russian and Spanish.

Series[Gt. Brit. Foreign Office] Treaty series,, 1961, no. 97, [Gt. Brit. Parliament. Papers by command] cmnd., 1535, Cmd. (Great Britain. Parliament) ;, 1535.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJX636 1892 1961 no. 97
The Physical Object
Pagination27 p.
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5845717M
LC Control Number62003895
OCLC/WorldCa26781866

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The treaty encouraged the freedom of scientific investigation and the exchange of scientific information and personnel in Antarctica. The treaty bound its members indefinitely, with a review of its provisions possible after 30 years. A protocol to the treaty was signed in The Antarctic Treaty Done at Washington 1 December Entered into force 23 June The Governments of Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Chile, the French Republic, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, the Union of South Africa, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America, RECOGNIZING that it is in .   The Conference on Antarctica, Washington, October 15 to December 1, by Conference on Antarctica, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. ANTARCTIC TREATY Signed at Washington December 1, Recommendations (10) adopted at the Second Consultative Meeting Buenos Aires July 18 – 28, Effective date*: Janu Date of Government's approval, as notified to Government of the State United States of America** Argentina Septem Australia Octo

Antarctic Treaty, done at Washington December 1, Depositary – Treaty Affairs. Office of Treaty Affairs In accordance with Article XIII, the Treaty was subject to ratification by the signatory States and is open for accession by any State which is a Member of the United Nations, or by any other State which may be invited to accede to. The Antarctic Treaty Adopted at Washington 1 December The Governments of Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Chile, the French Republic, Japan, New Zealand, Nor-way, the Union of South Africa, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America. The Antarctic Treaty was signed in Washington on 1 December by the twelve countries whose scientists had been active in and around Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) of It entered into force in and has since been acceded to by many other nations. The total number of Parties to the Treaty is now The Antartic Treaty, December 1, The Governments of Argentina, Australia Belgium, Chile, the French Republic, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, the Union of South Africa, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the United States of America, Recognizing that it is in the interest of all mankind that Antarctica shall continue forever to .

  The Antarctic Treaty was signed in Washington on 1 December by the twelve countries whose scientists had been active in and around Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) of It entered into force in and has since been acceded to by many other nations. The total number of Parties toAuthor: Never a Straight Answer. The Antarctic Treaty, signed in Washington on December 1, , enshrines Antarctica as a place of peace, science and international cooperation. See the article in its original context from December 2, , Page 46 Buy Reprints. WASHINGTON, Dec. 1 -- Following is the text of the Antarctic treaty signed here today. Signed at Washington December 1, Entered into force J Narrative Treaty Text. Narrative. The Antarctic Treaty, the earliest of the post-World War II arms limitation agreements, has significance both in itself and as a precedent. It demilitarized the Antarctic Continent and provided for its cooperative exploration and future use.